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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#16
HKY09 wrote:I thought I addressed this with the idea that left-wing governments keep leaning and inching to the left, right governments would keep leaning and inching to the right, up governments keep leaning and inching to the up, right-up governments keep leaning and inching etc etc etc.
I've cautioned before (elsewhere) that realism is less valuable to a game than plausibility. That said, this might be one of those times when it's worth looking at how political systems change in the real world to think about how they might be made to change in the LT game world.

Which is that, rather than Left and Right governments getting Leftier and Rightier, the opposite seems to be what really happens. For example, China moves rightward by introducing (some) market-based reforms, while the U.S. increasingly edges leftward by adding regulatory and social-welfare burdens. The revolutions (through dissolution or conquest) happen when political-economic systems spend enough time in the mushy middle to become stagnant compared to more energetic neighbor cultures.

But it's not necessarily the case that a game that simulates some elements of an economy must follow this plodding-to-the-middle process. For gameplay purposes, a "more of the same" process as you described might be more interesting, as I agree it sets up a faction for a more overt kind of internal "we need a change!" revolution.

Personally I think I'd rather see the more real-world model used in LT, but then I'm a sucker for simulation. :) I do value mechanics-play because I know it's important to most other gamers, though. So I still think the starter post in this thread was excellent, and I hope more people here will contribute to it.
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#17
Thank you Flatfinges. You make me feel good at conceptual design :D

That being said, I would like an option or a mod for a more expanded governing system.
I would also like an official response *nudge nudge*

Also, I was playing around with the idea that some policies should be unique and require certain goals to be achieved, or are randomly assigned to planets, also that there should be certain classes of planets:
- Barren: completely uncolonised and devoid of all intelligent life
- Terra Nullius: a planet that is owned by a faction, but with no facilities or colonies to speak off making the claim partially loose. As long as the planet remains yours, future colonies will belong to you and operate under your policy.
- Colonised: the planet has a facility or colony and either under the control of a colonial government (see below) or a faction.
- Developed: more than one colony and facility, planet is 'unified', so to speak, under a faction.

Then the unique policies
Political:
- Colonial: independent colonial government on an unowned world - has a chance to unite with other independent colonies and evolves into a planetery faction with its government policies decided primarily by culture. Has no bonuses or penalties to speak of.

- Thinktank: Massive research boost, unfortunate slowed military production. You lose happiness if you neighbour a faction who is more technologically advanced than you (more powerful weapons or more theoretical science known). Unlocked by technological superiority over a sizeable portion of known factions.

Economic:
- Colonial: basically an economic version of its political counterpart.

- White Flag: you advocate peace among everyone. Factions are generally nicer to you. You get more bonuses to happiness and stability the longer you can stay away from war, and even more bonuses for having a lack of military weapons for self defence. This system is unlocked whenever you have zero 'big ships' in your fleet. You get more bonuses to technology research. Try to stay away from fleet building and conquering, lest people see what a sham their economic system is.
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#19
Cornflakes_91 wrote:
HKY09 wrote:instead of having LT turn into a 4x multi genre game.
I dont see a problem in that, as LT is already advertised as multi-genre game
Esoteric (5). We want a system basic enough that players can engage in it, but not have it totally absorb their gameplay experience outside of governing.
I would like more advanced governing, just so I can declare myself Baron of my home planet and manage its economy, laws, etc (with the possibility of procedurally issues to tackle xP), but I don't see that happening without mod support. Unless JP wantsmto start another stretch goal on Kickstarter...? :D
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#21
Cornflakes_91 wrote:If you dont want to do it, hire an AI to do ot for you
I like that idea, but it should run the appropriate risk of the governor defecting or rebellion against your faction and subsequent loss of the planet as he gets drunk with power. :D
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#23
Cornflakes_91 wrote:I guess one source of rebellion is enough.

Either the colony itself or the governor, while i'd prefer the colony side rebellions.
Maybe I should rephrase what I mean...
See, AI governors should be a thing, and they should vary on effectiveness based on price (the higher, the better) but it should be important that you need a relationship with him, and something to keep him in check while in power (a hyper-class dreadnought should do it :D) so he doesn't get drunk on power, which might lead to the governor declaring his independence or his disenfranchised citizen base declaring open rebellion.
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#24
This depends on which types of AI are allowed to do such management tasks.

If worker NPC's can do such tasks they'd be loyal, as they are per definition in the game.
(They are just commodities that you buy and follow your orders slavishly)

If only executive NPC's are capable of such tasks they can defect you, but thats not part of the colony interaction but general AI interaction
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#25
Cornflakes_91 wrote:This depends on which types of AI are allowed to do such management tasks.

If worker NPC's can do such tasks they'd be loyal, as they are per definition in the game.
(They are just commodities that you buy and follow your orders slavishly)

If only executive NPC's are capable of such tasks they can defect you, but thats not part of the colony interaction but general AI interaction
Perhaps it should be a thing among high pressure occupations - keeping your administrators and admirals happy or you might lose them to defection or worse.
What do you think?
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#26
HKY09 wrote: Perhaps it should be a thing among high pressure occupations - keeping your administrators and admirals happy or you might lose them to defection or worse.
What do you think?
Well, this goes into general AI interaction and is less directly connected to planetary control.


Im a bit torn on that myself.

Loyal commanders or permanent threat of defection and treachery.


How about this:
Execs can do everything on their own, think strategically in flatfingers scale.
You just give them some money and a task and in theory they'd build a trade empire to get the money to destroy a designated target.
Creating fleet structures, designing ships, everything to do your bidding.

Worker npc's can only think in operational scales.
So they take the assets you give them, maintain them, replace them.
Basically being an abstraction layer for micromanagement.
but they cant think big and independent.
If you give them the task "build up mining operations in this system" (without extra informations) they cant do it.
You have to tell them "build a trade station, 5 mines and asorted transporters in this system".


In this frame it depends on what you want to do with the planet/colony.

If you just want to tell "make money" you have to use a executive NPC.
If you are willing to manage the colony to a level "build 5 factories and 2 spaceports" you only have to use worker NPC's.
No NPC control of the colony would need you to sort out resource aquirition too (and all other minutia like maintainance).



edit:
So workers use structure.
Executives create structure
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#27
Cornflakes_91 wrote:.How about this:
You just give them some money and a task and in theory they'd build a trade empire to get the money to destroy a designated target.
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :wtf:
Image The results of logic, of natural progression? Boring! An expected result? Dull! An obvious next step? Pfui! Where is the fun in that? A dream may soothe, but our nightmares make us run!
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#28
Cornflakes_91 wrote:
HKY09 wrote: Perhaps it should be a thing among high pressure occupations - keeping your administrators and admirals happy or you might lose them to defection or worse.
What do you think?
Well, this goes into general AI interaction and is less directly connected to planetary control.


Im a bit torn on that myself.

Loyal commanders or permanent threat of defection and treachery.


How about this:
Execs can do everything on their own, think strategically in flatfingers scale.
You just give them some money and a task and in theory they'd build a trade empire to get the money to destroy a designated target.
Creating fleet structures, designing ships, everything to do your bidding.

Worker npc's can only think in operational scales.
So they take the assets you give them, maintain them, replace them.
Basically being an abstraction layer for micromanagement.
but they cant think big and independent.
If you give them the task "build up mining operations in this system" (without extra informations) they cant do it.
You have to tell them "build a trade station, 5 mines and asorted transporters in this system".


In this frame it depends on what you want to do with the planet/colony.

If you just want to tell "make money" you have to use a executive NPC.
If you are willing to manage the colony to a level "build 5 factories and 2 spaceports" you only have to use worker NPC's.
No NPC control of the colony would need you to sort out resource aquirition too (and all other minutia like maintainance).



edit:
So workers use structure.
Executives create structure
That sounds like a new idea of itself.
Create a thread :D
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Re: Managing Planetary Government

#30
Cornflakes_91 wrote:
HKY09 wrote: That sounds like a new idea of itself.
Create a thread :D
I thought that myself after i was done ^^

the worker/executive split has been a big question mark for a while now, time we answer the question ^^
Link when its up
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